WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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FACE TO FACE WITH
HERBERT HAGEN

We were also determined to film Herbert Hagen.

On Sunday evening, after our first interview with Lischka, I telephoned Hagen's house in Warstein and asked his wife whether he would consent to an interview with a French journalist. After a few minutes she came back to the telephone and said: "There's no chance of an interview. Furthermore, my husband does not understand why you want to interview him."

I cut the conversation short, for I knew that people have to leave their house once in a while, and that Monday, February 22, would be Carnival day in Germany's Sauerland.

We left Cologne at 6 A.M. the next day and reached Warstein, 12 miles to the northeast, about 8:30. We went directly to Wilhelmstrasse. It was hard to find a spot from which we could keep watch, but we finally parked a hundred yards from Hagen's house, pointed the car toward it, and settled down to wait. We had driven past the house and noticed that only two families lived in it.

We waited for five hours and were beginning to lose hope when the Carnival music began to blare. I was very hungry and went to a restaurant. Meanwhile Serge and Harry saw a man in a tweed
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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