WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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STILL IN
PURSUIT

On February 15, I learned that President Pompidou had written Colonel Banzer a "forceful and urgent" letter. Later I heartily endorsed what it said:
Time wipes out many things, but not all. Unless their sense of justice is sadly tarnished, Frenchmen cannot permit crimes and sacrifices to be lumped together and then forgotten through indifference.

The Bolivian government assigned the Barbie case to their Supreme Court. Its justices had been appointed after Colonel Banzer's putsch of August 1971, when their predecessors were removed long before the end of their term.

Mme. Lazurick, the owner of L'Aurore, answered my call for help and got me two plane tickets. Not only did she appreciate my furnishing her paper with so much material, but she was as eager as Ito see Barbie brought to trial. But I could not persuade Barbie's victim, Mme. Lagrange, to go with me. She wrote:
I want to assure you that I will be with you in La Paz in spirit, and if I do not go with you, it is because all the associations concerned have asked me to postpone going until the Bolivian government replies to our President's letter. This is not to say that I want to hamper the progress of justice, but to assure you that later on, if positive identification is necessary and can be arranged, I will be ready to go then.
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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