WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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OTHER BATTLES IN
GERMANY

I wasted no time in again taking the offensive against the German political establishment, which, by repeatedly delaying ratification of the Franco-German judiciary accord of February 2, 1971, was consciously perpetuating the impunity of the Nazi criminals who had operated in France.

I had for a long time been on the trail of Heinrich Biers, S.S.-Hauptsturmführer, deputy to Kurt Lischka, head of the Nazi police (S.D.), Paris region. Illers was also head of the Gestapo in Paris. Serge had accumulated a voluminous dossier on Illers who, on August 24, 1944, personally made the decision to dispatch from Compiègne a final deportation convoy from France. The agreement between German General von Choltitz and Swedish Consul Raoul Nordling prohibiting further deportations had already been concluded, but Illers ignored this.

Knowing that Illers was a "Herr Doktor," we were able to locate him as Senatspräsident of the Landessozialgericht of Lower Saxony, and ... expert in war-victim litigation.

In order to have Illers removed, we had to dramatize our disclosure. We decided to hold a press conference at Bonn in the restaurant Am Tulpenfeld, in the press center. On Tuesday morning October 3, 1972, although there was a warrant for his arrest in Germany, Serge joined Jean Pierre-Bloch and me in
     
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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