WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
Previous Page Back  Contents  Contents Page 300 Home Page Home Page  Forward Next Page 
     
The award of this medal, in recognition of the solidarity I feel toward Israel, has encouraged me to attempt once more a difficult test of strength to obtain ratification. But the road ahead is a long one, for ratification will only be the achievement of the political phase: the consent of the German Parliament that the German courts are competent in regard to Nazi criminals. Next will come an equally arduous phase, the judiciary one. But we must face one step at a time. If I thought only about the innumerable obstacles between me and my objective, I would be demoralized.

We work out a plan. Each of our actions must include people or places that have strong symbolic meaning. Such meaning must be present in order that any single and generally peaceful demonstration may generate unforeseen power, an activating shock that will make those to whom the demonstration is addressed aware of their responsibilities. Tomorrow the symbol will be Dachau and my arrest there. We must set a trap for the German police since, if I am arrested outside the compound, the desired effect will be lost and I might rot in prison. Yet we know that no policeman feels that entering a compound where tens of thousands of anti-Nazis were assassinated will lead to a confrontation with his conscience. That is one of the problems of the German conscience: the absence of reflection and comprehension, on both the individual and
    
   
 
WHEREVER THEY MAY BE
© 1972, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
Previous Page  Back Page 300 Forward  Next Page