The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Part I – The Jewish Question until 1941

1. The Incubation Period of Hitler's Anti-Jewish Action (1933 – 1938)

Hitler was as prudent in the launching of his anti-Jewish action as he was in demonstrating that the Third Reich was destined, by expansion, to become Great Germany.

In February and March 1933, anti-Jewish exactions took place in several localities. (1) The terms "Judeo Bolshevism" and "Judeo-plutocracy" also continued to form part of the Nazi vocabulary, which was henceforth endowed with the dignity of being a governmental one. This alarming news arrived abroad and set off protests in the international press. Hitler attributed these anti Nazi reactions to Jewish emigration from the Reich and retorted immediately by officially ordering, at the end of March, the boycott of Jewish businesses, doctors and lawyers. (2) This boycott lasted but one day, the first of April. Goebbels noted on April third: "The propaganda of atrocities has diminished very considerably. That is why the Cabinet has decided to not resume the boycott for the moment." He added that this means of pressure would be maintained as a menace without actually being applied. Until November 1938, Hitler carefully endeavored to avoid all public demonstrations against the Jews.

Until November 1938 (with the exception of Austria, annexed to the Reich), the exclusion of Jews from the professions was effected with caution and a certain hesitation. The first legislative act against the social position of the Jews of Germany was taken some days after the boycott. In the law of April 7, 1933, on the reform of the Civil Service, the prohibition of Jews in public office was implied. A law of April 25 introduced a quota for Jews in the schools and universities. The law of September 29, 1933, created the Chamber of Culture of the Reich, to which writers, journalists and artists were obliged to belong. This law excluded non Aryans but allowed for exceptions. It was only in January 1939 that Goebbels insistantly [sic] ordered the "dejudaizing of the Chambers." (3)
 
   
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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