The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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To these measures were added initiatives which were more or less local and occasionally private. Exclusions were decreed from various occupations having to do with public service (for example, that of doctor employed by the Social Security); certain employers laid off their Jewish employees, (4) sometimes under pressure from the Party. Jewish schoolchildren and students were prevented from sitting for certain examinations. As for Jews in the economy, no general rules restrained their economic activity. But the anti Jewish policy of the regime created worry and uncertainty among the Jewish people, an insecurity which sometimes encouraged them to sell their belongings at a loss. Certain non-Jews took advantage of this. (5)

Finally, the psychological climate of scornful hatred with regard to the Jew was marked by vexing prohibitions (6) decreed locally to close public places and prohibit use of public equipment "to Jews and dogs". The Nazi authorities played down this point in anticipation of the Olympic Games which were to be held in Berlin in the summer of 1936. But his attenuation was temporary (CDXXXVII-45).

Thus Hitler's regime humiliated the Jews, but (except for uncontrolable [sic] incidents) without violence. As Hitler proclaimed on March 27, 1933, on calling for the boycott: "Not one hair of the Jews will be twisted." The Jewish population, transformed into a body foreign to the nation, could still live by collaborating with it: the Jews were not excluded from the economy and in addition even a man such as Goebbels tolerated a few of them in cultural affairs. A number of the most distinguished professions remained open to them. The prohibition to practice medicine dates from July 1938 and that to practice law from September of the same year.

The most striking blow cast against the German Jews between 1933 and 1938 was the promulgation of the two laws adopted in Nuremberg by the Reichstag meeting during the Congress of the Party in September 1935. It is a question of the legal and dishonoring alienation of the German Jew from his non Jewish fellow citizens. The law on citizenship enacted on September 15, 1935, established the difference between the German citizen, endowed with civil rights, and the dependent of the Reich, who did not possess these rights. A second law of the same date forbade marriage and sexual relations between a Jew and a person of German or related blood. The law transformed the Jews into a group of outcasts in the midst of the German people since it was entitled "Defense of the German Blood and Honour."

Before November 1938, the Jews (aside from those of Austria annexed to the Reich in March 1938) were not reduced by the regulations to a miserable life of inactivity. Nevertheless, their condition of pariahs little by little weakened the foundation of their existence and plunged them progressively into misery and disarray. We may cite the report presented in July 1938 by the Jewish communities of Vienna and of the Reich at the Conference of Evian. This conference was attended by reprensentatives [sic] of thirty two states meeting to discuss the possibilities
     
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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