The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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but also concerning the diverse tendencies which were being formed within the Nazi Party itself. (15) It was, however, relatively inactive between 1933 and 1937. Its chief, Heydrich, concentrated his efforts on the Gestapo. The two principal sections of the SD were Section II, "Internal Affairs" (Inland), and Section III, "Foreign." In Section II an "Adversaries" service was formed; it covered in particular "ideological adversaries," which included the service concerning Free Masons (II1). Within this service a sub-section for Jewish affairs (figure II112) was to be created. The first chief of II-112 was von Mildenstein, replaced (16) by Schroeder who kept the position until April 1937. Heydrich had just ordered a more dynamic activity of II1, and Schroeder was removed in favour of Wisliceny. But the real impetus was not to be given until the second half of 1937. Wisliceny was replaced in November 1937 by Herbert Hagen (CXXXVII-18) (17) whereas all of II1 received for chief a young and brilliant professor, F.A. Six. The latter, in addition to his activities in the SD, was at the same time to be director of the Foreign Policy Institute. He had already previously worked with Hagen. The II 112 was divided into three parts: "Assimilated Jews," "Orthodox Jews" – a part which was to remain embryonic – and "Zionism." The first subject was at the beginning treated by Schroeder and as of March 1937 by Dannecker (CDXXXVII-18); the third was confided to Eichmann.

Himmler destined the SD to become the intelligence service inspiring the Gestapo, while at the same time remaining independent and retaining its statute from the SS and not from the State. He required of the SD a freedom of mind which the functionaries of the police lacked. Those of the SD lent themselves to a careful study of the problems they explored and reached objective points of view from which they drew what were to them well-founded conclusions. The independence of the SD did not always dispose the Gestapo to collaborate. But this collaboration was established on good terms in the Jewish question, at least until 1937.

5. The Preparation of the "Final Solution": The SS Destined to Inspire the Gestapo Hitler waited for more than five years before undertaking the liquidation of the Jewish presence from the German vital space. He did not, however, leave the world ignorant of his intentions for so long a period. It was known that the intended to proceed with this liquidation at a certain time and to entrust this governmental action to the non-governmental organization of the SS, the only one capable of executing this solution in a radical manner. In September 1935, he presented to the Reichstag meeting at Nuremberg the three laws of Hitlerism: that of the flag of the Third Reich (flag with the swastika), that of citizenship in the Reich, and finally that concerning the protection of the German blood and honour.
 


 
   
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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