The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Hagen thus weighed the advantages and disadvantages of the Zionist emigration and decided that the advantages were greater. The voyage took place between September 26 and October 2, 1937. Eichmann was accompanied by Hagen himself. At his trial he spoke of Hagen as his superior here. This is not quite true because Hagen took over the II-112 only in November 1937. He nevertheless occupied, directly next to Six, a position superior to that of Eichmann, albeit in a different service of the II-1. Although their position of emissaries of the SD was camouflaged, the English authorities prevented Hagen and Eichmann from entering Palestine from Egypt. The two envoys of the SD succeeded even so in meeting Polkes in Egypt and in informing themselves of the situation there and in a Palestine. The report (CDLXXX-8) dated 4 and 27 November, 1937 (Hagen already being chief of the II-112), was drawn up for the greater part by Hagen. Eichmann related only his discussions with Polkes in Cairo. As for relations between the Jews and the Arabs, Hagen judged that the Arabs had no racial hatred towards the Jews, but that they were against them only if their own interests were threatened by them. Counting on Zionism, Hagen did not however neglect anti-Judaism. In conclusion he proclaimed "the total incompetence of the Jews to direct the economy of their country" and declared
"the habit the Jews have of deceiving each other is evidently not the most minor reason for the economic chaos of Palestine, even more so because the absence of Aryans does not allow the Jews to trade with them..." (41a)
As for Eichmann, he declared himself opposed to Polkes's propositions (without having admitted this to him) which risked making Palestine too powerful and were inspired by the Havara agreement to which, according to Eichmann, the SD was opposed. He agreed with the point of view of Wisliceny who in July 1937, in an "Orientation Notebook" which he wrote for the SS Office on Race and Implantation, argued against the creation of a Jewish state in Palestine. The reason advanced was that this state would serve as a cover for all the Jewish minorities in the countries that they would continue to exploit (point of view also defended by A. Rosenberg). The Nazi support of Zionism was evidently a great paradox. The fact remains, however, that the SD accepted this paradox. It was sufficient that the propensity to massive emigration which was inherent to Zionism be able to immediately serve the liquidation of the Jewish presence from the Reich.
8. The Anticipation of the Final Solution: Hagen and Eichmann in Vienna

Until March 1938 the solution to the Jewish question was, so to speak, in incubation in the Third Reich. The signal that brought it suddenly to the foreground was the annexation of Austria. Beginning imme […diately]
 

   
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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