The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
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Eichmann gave the following suggestive description of the manner in which orders were given by Himmler (89):
"One must not believe, however, that Himmler constantly and abundantly took care of Jewish affairs. But the subject was by itself a burning one in Party circles. A brief phrase pronounced by Himmler, an instruction given to his aide de camp (R. Brandt), to his personal staff (K. Wolff), to C.d.S. (Heydrich) to a Höherer SS und Polizeiführer during a visit to his command post or, in time of peace, to his office, sufficed; and this brief instruction, this brief order then unleashed, on the part of the authorities concerned, a flood of work, discussions, requests for declarations of approval from authorities other than the Sipo-SD, but which had to be heard or consulted so as to not feel neglected. That is what gave, for example, the most work to the IV B4."
Let us try to indicate the succession of decisions which from 1940 to 1942 led to the "final solution of the Jewish question."

5. The "Final Solution" by a Jewish Colonial Reserve (Summer 1940 -Spring 1941)

From the very first stage of the war – the invasion of Poland – the Hitlerian regime had to decide the fate of the greater part of East European Judaism. The meaning of this question was later (April 1944) summed up by Six, who was at the time Chief of the Cultural Department at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. At a meeting of German diplomatic representatives abroad, a meeting organized to brief them on the anti-Jewish action (PS-3319), he explained that the
"physical elimination of Eastern Judaism deprives Judaism of its biological reserves".
On September 12, 1939, deliberations took place in Hitler's train, in Poland, among the chiefs of the Wehrmacht. Ribbentrop (91) attended them with the military men. The question of the extermination of diverse categories of the population in Poland was brought up in the sense that Hitler wanted. Lahousen, present at these conversations, testified before the Nuremberg Tribunal that the general directive was to exterminate in Poland "the intellectuals, the nobility, the clergy and, naturally, the Jews." This vague glimpse of Hitler's conceptions at that moment was to be sufficient for Himmler and Heydrich to isolate the most evident point which could be begun in its totality, that is, the treatment of the Jews. Heydrich prepared a long term plan of action which he communicated on September 22, 1939 (PS-3363), to the chiefs of his mobile killing units in Polish territory. Let us recall that he exposed to them a series of measures which were in the long range to end in the accomplishment of a "final goal" which he declared to be secret. Given that the plan for the creation of a Jewish reserve in the General Government ("Nisko") was not kept secret, it was a question of something else, something to be treated as unacknowledgeable. The project of a transfer of the Polish Jewish population to another continent was not kept secret, either. In these conditions, the secret of the "final goal" appears in rather a macabre light.
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
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