The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
 
 
Previous Page Back  Contents  Contents Page 60 Home Page Home Page  Forward Next Page 
     
in March 1942. It was on June 11 that Eichmann met in Berlin with his representatives in France (Dannecker), in Belgium and in Holland to inform them (XXVI-29) that Himmler had given the order to deport for the work at Auschwitz important quantities of Jews from these three countries (128). This operation was curiously explained by the impossibility for military reasons of deporting the Jews of the Reich to the "zones of operation" during the summer. One would say that it was necessary to justify the decision to begin the deportation from the countries occupied in the West, while the deportation of the Jews from the Reich and from the Protectorate was not yet ended. Let us add that in spite of Eichmann's explanation, the deportation from the Reich continued during the summer and the autumn of 1942, more precisely to the regions of Riga and Minsk.

In the instructions given by Eichmann on June 11, 1942, on the deportations from the western countries, the rigour with which the age limits for deportable Jews were set – sixteen to forty five – seems astonishhing [sic]. It was in addition rather rapidly annulled. This limitation which Eichmann designated as essential underscored that the deportation was to be undertaken for the strictly economic reasons of labour. One would say that Eichmann in the RSHA had received the order from Principal Office of Economic Administration of the SS, to which the Inspection of the Concentration Camps belonged, and which was primarily interested in the economic exploitation of the internees. Eichmann apparently transmitted the order such as he had received it. But the age limits were soon extended again, even before the series of deportations from the countries in question had really begun. In particular, the deportation of children of all ages was accepted by the RSHA, this in response to steps taken by Dannecker from his post in Paris.

Eichmann had indicated at the meeting held on June 11, 1942, in Berlin that 10% of persons unfit for work could be accepted in the transports of deportees. When the convoys began to reach Auschwitz, the people arriving were in their very large majority considered as unfit for work; and they were killed in the gas chambers that Hoess had prepared in conformity with the order received from Himmler in 1941.

At Auschwitz an average of 80% of the Jewish deportees were thus immediately liquidated. The rest represented the Jewish concentrationary labour strongly desired by Himmler; it largely disappeared, more or less rapidly by the mortality due to the living and working conditions in the camps and the work commandos. The employment of this rest was nevertheless an important factor in the economic plans of the SS, the realization of which was being pursued by Himmler with Pohl, Chief of the Principal Office of the Economic Administration of the SS. But the weight of the 80% immediately liquidated showed that the deportation of the Jews was being effected primarily for their extermination.
    
   

 
The Holocaust and the Neo-Nazi Mythomania
© 1978, The Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
Previous Page  Back Page 60 Forward  Next Page